anyway, whatever i guess.
me, probably, about some complex personal emotional problem  (via geeses)

(via coolstorysenpai)


doubleadrivel:

weliveonfiction:

flatbear:

cumberbitch-in-a-tardis:

marin-fluently-sarcastic:

counterpunches:

Gordon Ramsay is my favorite.

i just want to hug all of them

Fun story. I cooked for this dude, once. I did my kitchen apprenticeship at the family-style restaurant of one of New Zealand’s premiere chefs, and he knew Ramsay really well. He was in New Zealand for a few weeks, and Martin brought him by the restaurant to check it out. It was right on the beach, fucking gorgeous. I was the only one there (apprentice = bitch work = 4am starting shifts), and they asked me to whip up some breakfast for them. It was SUPER simple, fried fish, eggs cooked in bread, sausages. He was incredibly gracious and kind, asked me to join them (I couldn’t, too much work to do, so they sat at the kitchen window so they could talk to me), and was super interested in hearing about my english grandma, who had taught me how to cook. I won’t hear a single bad word against this man, for all of his kitchen hysterics, he treated me like an equal.

gordon ramsay fandom

If you’re not in the Gordon Ramsay fandom you’re wrong.

(via gingercharlotte)



gallows-calibrating:

one time I had this dream that I logged on to amazon and my account had like negative four trillion dollars because i accidentally bought the city of Paris

(via coolstorysenpai)


niyantha:

I was having breakfast in Leh when I saw Erwin filming something with a DSLR.
“I’m trying to shoot the smoke from that agarbatti there,” he said.
As we got talking, we realized that we had followed surprisingly similar paths. We had both worked in tech in the US, and had left our jobs to travel. We both had cameras on us and were working on independent projects. He was capturing, on video, movements in Ladakh, and I was capturing the photos of people I met in the region.
“I wish I had met you earlier,” he said. “I leave tomorrow.”
“Well, what are you doing today?” I asked.
—-
“Have you ridden pillion?” Erwin asked as he revved the Enfield.
“Not recently,” I said, as I fiddled with my helmet.
“Well, just don’t hold on to the back of the bike. Makes it hard to balance.”
“Got it,” I said, and swung my leg over the seat to get on. I missed the footrest on the other side, lost my balance and knocked my helmet against the back of his.
“Sorry.”
—-
There was traffic initially but we were soon cruising on National Highway 1 towards Likhir Monastery. It was a location-scouting ride; we kept our eyes open for photo-ops and stopped whenever we saw something worth capturing. 
On one of the breaks, I asked Erwin what he felt was the major difference between shooting video and taking photos.
“When you’re shooting video, you’re looking out for movement, like the fluttering motion of Tibetan prayer flags. You want to keep it simple, though. When you take a picture of a landscape, you can include a lot of detail because the viewer has time to process it. But with a video, you need to reduce the confusion.”
—-
Erwin started his travels in Europe where he spent three months backpacking in the Scandinavian countries. His visa soon ran out, and he headed to Udupi in Karnataka where his parents lived.
“One month became two, two became three and after a while I just wanted to get out. If you have a Western visa, you can go to the Philippines for a couple of weeks. I still had a Canadian tourist visa, so I went. I had wanted to settle down somewhere for a while and do my own thing. Hopping from one place to another was getting tiring. I liked the Philippines. So after those two weeks, I came back to India, and applied for the right visa.”
“When was this?”
“This was in February. I’ve got an apartment waiting for me when I go back.”
—-
People in Ladakh (Part 17 of 19)
Facebook | Flickr

niyantha:

I was having breakfast in Leh when I saw Erwin filming something with a DSLR.

“I’m trying to shoot the smoke from that agarbatti there,” he said.

As we got talking, we realized that we had followed surprisingly similar paths. We had both worked in tech in the US, and had left our jobs to travel. We both had cameras on us and were working on independent projects. He was capturing, on video, movements in Ladakh, and I was capturing the photos of people I met in the region.

“I wish I had met you earlier,” he said. “I leave tomorrow.”

“Well, what are you doing today?” I asked.

—-

“Have you ridden pillion?” Erwin asked as he revved the Enfield.

“Not recently,” I said, as I fiddled with my helmet.

“Well, just don’t hold on to the back of the bike. Makes it hard to balance.”

“Got it,” I said, and swung my leg over the seat to get on. I missed the footrest on the other side, lost my balance and knocked my helmet against the back of his.

“Sorry.”

—-

There was traffic initially but we were soon cruising on National Highway 1 towards Likhir Monastery. It was a location-scouting ride; we kept our eyes open for photo-ops and stopped whenever we saw something worth capturing. 

On one of the breaks, I asked Erwin what he felt was the major difference between shooting video and taking photos.

“When you’re shooting video, you’re looking out for movement, like the fluttering motion of Tibetan prayer flags. You want to keep it simple, though. When you take a picture of a landscape, you can include a lot of detail because the viewer has time to process it. But with a video, you need to reduce the confusion.”

—-

Erwin started his travels in Europe where he spent three months backpacking in the Scandinavian countries. His visa soon ran out, and he headed to Udupi in Karnataka where his parents lived.

“One month became two, two became three and after a while I just wanted to get out. If you have a Western visa, you can go to the Philippines for a couple of weeks. I still had a Canadian tourist visa, so I went. I had wanted to settle down somewhere for a while and do my own thing. Hopping from one place to another was getting tiring. I liked the Philippines. So after those two weeks, I came back to India, and applied for the right visa.”

“When was this?”

“This was in February. I’ve got an apartment waiting for me when I go back.”

—-

People in Ladakh (Part 17 of 19)

Facebook | Flickr



belindapendragon:

I love my skin!

Beautiful…

(via allonsyvanessa)


For some reason I had loads of pictures of darkness in my gallery, so in my perturbed state I decided to give it a pretty frame.

For some reason I had loads of pictures of darkness in my gallery, so in my perturbed state I decided to give it a pretty frame.


crasher-vania:

Winner winner melon dinner

crasher-vania:

Winner winner melon dinner


fiseebilillah:

elvenlocks:

sarbrez:

f-e-f-e-t-a-c-a-k-e-s:

the-unpopular-opinions:

I think that the USA needs to move on from September 11th.
Now before all you pseudo-patriots come attempting to sway my opinion with your “unwavering loyalty to the country”, let me just take a minute to explain things. I am an American. I’m a female. And I was a young girl when the events took place.
The events are tragic. I’m not saying that they aren’t. But the US government and the media make it out to be some worldwide catastrophe that claimed the lives of millions of people around the world, when really, the event only killed about 2,600 people, which in the grand scheme of things for a large country like the United States isn’t a huge number.
Also, we’re Americans. Not only are we extremely self-absorbed with our ignorance, fueled by the liberally biased media, we’re hardly sympathetic for our victims. We forced unspeakable violence upon the natives when we came here, we killed almost 150,000 people in dropping the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and we’ve pointlessly murdered innocent people in the Middle East.
I understand that a lot of people died, and I should be respecting them. But while we honor the dead, we can’t have these extravagant 2-hour TV specials reading the names of all these people who died 12 years after the disaster. You don’t see Japan having these insane specials reading off the names of people who died in their terrorist attacks. Yes, that qualifies as a terrorist attack.
I honestly don’t care anymore. Terrorist attacks happen all the time in other countries every day. Just because this one happened in America doesn’t make it any different. It was a terrible thing that happened, but it’s been 12 years. We killed Osama. Why we are still in Iraq, I will never know, but that’s a story for another time. The USA is comparable to a person who still clings to their ex-spouse or significant other years after they broke up.
We have to move on with our lives. Not forget about it completely, but just move on and keep in it the back of our thoughts.

Finally.
Finally someone says it.
Kudos.

im Canadian and I even felt gulty saying it. but this post is true as fuck.

So glad someone said this. I didn’t know how to word it, but this is the fucking truth. We only care about death when it happens to our citizens.

Finally.

fiseebilillah:

elvenlocks:

sarbrez:

f-e-f-e-t-a-c-a-k-e-s:

the-unpopular-opinions:

I think that the USA needs to move on from September 11th.

Now before all you pseudo-patriots come attempting to sway my opinion with your “unwavering loyalty to the country”, let me just take a minute to explain things. I am an American. I’m a female. And I was a young girl when the events took place.

The events are tragic. I’m not saying that they aren’t. But the US government and the media make it out to be some worldwide catastrophe that claimed the lives of millions of people around the world, when really, the event only killed about 2,600 people, which in the grand scheme of things for a large country like the United States isn’t a huge number.

Also, we’re Americans. Not only are we extremely self-absorbed with our ignorance, fueled by the liberally biased media, we’re hardly sympathetic for our victims. We forced unspeakable violence upon the natives when we came here, we killed almost 150,000 people in dropping the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and we’ve pointlessly murdered innocent people in the Middle East.

I understand that a lot of people died, and I should be respecting them. But while we honor the dead, we can’t have these extravagant 2-hour TV specials reading the names of all these people who died 12 years after the disaster. You don’t see Japan having these insane specials reading off the names of people who died in their terrorist attacks. Yes, that qualifies as a terrorist attack.

I honestly don’t care anymore. Terrorist attacks happen all the time in other countries every day. Just because this one happened in America doesn’t make it any different. It was a terrible thing that happened, but it’s been 12 years. We killed Osama. Why we are still in Iraq, I will never know, but that’s a story for another time. The USA is comparable to a person who still clings to their ex-spouse or significant other years after they broke up.

We have to move on with our lives. Not forget about it completely, but just move on and keep in it the back of our thoughts.

Finally.

Finally someone says it.

Kudos.

im Canadian and I even felt gulty saying it. but this post is true as fuck.

So glad someone said this. I didn’t know how to word it, but this is the fucking truth. We only care about death when it happens to our citizens.

Finally.

(via crasher-vania)


wellheyproductions:

These valentine’s were so romantic, they brought tears to my eyes…

(via crasher-vania)


greatbuffalotradingpost:

Harrison Ford and Sean Connery on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, 1989

greatbuffalotradingpost:

Harrison Ford and Sean Connery on the set of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, 1989

(via crasher-vania)


lokisspy:

what a deal

lokisspy:

what a deal

(via polarbales)


red-lipstick:

Both Unknown Artists, can’t find anything about these two pics. Anybody know anything?


(via morganlaikes)